2015 Bobst Grant Recipients

2015 Recipients

Berman and Nugent

Chantal Berman and Elizabeth Nugent

Chantal Berman and Elizabeth Nugent spent the fall of 2014 in Tunis, Tunisia, conducting research on the country’s ongoing transition to democracy. On the day of the October legislative elections – the second democratic elections in Tunisia’s history – they teamed up with the Tunisian NGO Sawty to field an exit survey of nearly 1200 Tunisian voters. Forty-two enumerators were stationed at polling stations across five governorates to gather unique data on the preferences, ideologies, and social backgrounds of voters for different parties as they exited the polls.

Colby Clabaugh

Colby Clabaugh

Colby Clabaugh’s dissertation examines the political effects of natural disasters in comparative perspective. With Bobst Center support, he is conducting a survey of communities in Benin that were inundated with severe flooding in 2010. He has also used Bobst support to interview local officials in Louisiana and Mississippi about their governments’ responses to Hurricane Katrina.

Romain Ferrali

Romain Ferrali

Romain Ferrali used his Bobst Award to continue his research into how to leverage social networks and organizational structures to reduce corruption, but conducting a lab experiment with 320 participants in Morocco.

Grewal Sharan

Sharan Grewal

Sharan Grewal is a graduate student at Princeton whose writing has appeared in the journal International Organizations and the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog. His dissertation asks why some democratic transitions succeed while others fail. With support from the Bobst Center and other sources, he has conducted fieldwork over a number of years in both Egypt and Tunisia.

Aram Hur

Aram Hur’s research interests are Comparative political behavior in advanced and transitioning democracies, identity politics, public opinion, survey analysis, experimental methods, and East Asian politics. Aram spent seven months doing fieldwork across South Korea and Taiwan with funding from Bobst that helped her run an original survey experiment with National Chengchi University in Taiwan and conduct narrative interviews with potential and current citizen volunteers in the Taiwan military. Aram’s dissertation asks why individuals choose to comply with the state, even when it is costly.

Erin Lin

Erin Lin

Using both quantitative and qualitative data, Erin Lin seeks to identify the factors that lead to economic growth in post-conflict countries. Her research interests, more broadly, encompass the field of comparative politics, with a regional specialization in Southeast Asia.

Kevin Mazur

Kevin Mazur

Kevin Mazur’s research investigates the role of ethnic identity boundaries in the 2011 Syrian uprising. He conducted research in Lebanon and Kurdistan Regional Governorate – Iraq, carrying out interviews of participants in the uprising, as well as government officials and experts. During his fieldwork he also constructed a large database of local economic, social and political indicators to statistically test my theoretical claims.

Steve Monroe

Steve Monroe

Steve Monroe specializes in Comparative Politics with a focus on the Middle East. He studies the politics of private sector development, both from the perspective of elites and small and medium-sized enterprises. Steve’s work has been published in the Middle East Journal (2012).

Rohan Mukherjee

Rohan Mukherjee

Rohan Mukherjee's project looks at how the desire for great-power status shapes the rule-breaking or rule-following behaviors of rising powers in international arms control institutions. He was able to obtain material for the case of India with regard to the international nuclear non-proliferation regime.

Giuliana Pardelli

Giuliana Pardelli

Giuliana Pardelli used her Bobst grant to conduct research on the determinants of fiscal capacity at the local level in Brazil, traveling to different archives across the country to collect historical data on local taxes, administrative capacity, voting behavior, land concentration and conflict.

Joan

Joan Ricart-Huguet

Joan studies and presents evidence establishing the facts and exploring the reasons behind the disparity of distribution of colonial public investments (mainly infrastructure, education and health) in a set of British and French colonies in Africa, and how those historical inequalities impact the systems of the present day.

Vinay Sitapati

Vinay Sitapati

Vinay Sitapati is a Ph.D. candidate and graduate of Harvard Law School who studies comparative politics, law and India. In his dissertation he studies the circumstances when courts, working alongside grassroots movements, bring about political change.